Saltar al contenido principal

WFP South Sudan Situation Report #303, 31 July 2022

Países
Sudán del Sur
+ 1
Fuentes
WFP
Fecha de publicación

Highlights

• WFP has assisted 4 million people with food and nutrition assistance across South Sudan between January and June 2022.

• Continuing increase in global fuel prices, depreciation of the South Sudanese Pound, obstacles to trade and seasonal factors have led to food and fuel price hikes in South Sudan since the start of the Ukraine crisis.

• The humanitarian situation continued to deteriorate due to multiple shocks, including violence, conflict, access constraints, operational interference, and economic and climatic shocks.

Situation Update

• The security situation in South Sudan remained volatile throughout July. Sub-national and localized violence continued in different parts of the country, impacting the movement of goods and people along the main supply routes and driving up displacements.

• The humanitarian situation continued to deteriorate due to multiple shocks. Violence, conflict, access constraints, operational interference, and economic and climatic shocks continued to impact South Sudanese vulnerable households.

• Of the 12.4 million people living in South Sudan, 8.9 million require humanitarian assistance, with 7.7 million facing severe food insecurity (IPC 3 and above), meaning that over 60 percent of the population is struggling to put enough food on the table regularly.

• At least 87,000 people are already experiencing famine-like conditions (IPC 5), and 2.9 million others are just one step from catastrophe (IPC 4 – Emergency). In 2022, there is already a 36 percent increase in admissions to the treatment of acute malnutrition programmes, and over one-third of the counties in south Sudan have Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) rates that exceed the emergency threshold of 15 percent.

• Increasing global fuel prices, depreciation of the South Sudanese Pound (SSP), obstacles to trade and seasonal factors have led to food and fuel price hikes in South Sudan. By the end of July 2022, prices of staple cereals such as sorghum and maize had doubled in all monitored markets in Northern Bahr el Ghazal, Warrap, and the Eastern Equatoria States when compared to the pre-Ukraine crisis in late February this year.

• Supply chain disruptions resulting from poor road conditions and impassable rivers, tighter border point controls and intermittent communal conflicts continued to drive up the prices, exacerbating the vulnerability of poor households.