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Operational Update: Trauma Hospital Support to Puerto Rico, Ongoing Aid to Ukraine, Sri Lanka

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Ukraine
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Sources
Direct Relief
Date de publication
Origine
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Twelve countries, 46 U.S. states and territories received aid from Direct Relief over past seven days.

Over the past seven days, Direct Relief delivered 477 shipments of requested medical aid to 46 U.S. states and territories and 12 countries worldwide, including Ukraine.

The shipments contained 5.5 million defined daily doses of medication, including mental health medications, antibiotics, chronic disease medications, nutritional products, insulin, and cancer treatments.

Recently, Direct Relief donated a table-fixed surgical retractor system to the hospital which will allow providers greater visibility when operating and will increase exposure and the capability to perform complex surgical procedures. Puerto Rico’s Trauma Hospital is the only trauma facility on the island.

In response to recent health care supplies and medication shortages in Sri Lanka, Direct Relief donated antibiotics, thyroid medications, chronic disease medications, vitamins and syringes in May, as requested by the country’s Ministry of Health. This week, Direct Relief is preparing to send additional aid, as the country experiences continued shortages.

UKRAINE RESPONSE

Since February 24, Direct Relief has provided medical aid weighing more than 1.6 million pounds, or 800 tons, with more on the way. Over the past seven days, shipments including Covid-19 therapy medications, insulin, and antibiotics departed Direct Relief’s warehouse in California, bound for Ukraine.

To support those impacted by the war who are managing diabetes, Direct Relief recently provided 30,000 glucose meters with strips to Ukrainian Diabetes Federation, for distribution to cities and villages, to children’s hospital emergency rooms in military hospitals and to ophthalmology clinics across Ukraine.

Additionally, the fourth delivery of critical medical aid donated by Direct Relief was received this week by AICM Ukraine, for distribution to healthcare providers in northern and eastern Ukraine.

OPERATIONAL SNAPSHOT

WORLDWIDE

This week, outside the U.S., Direct Relief shipped more than 3.5 million defined daily doses of medication.

Countries that received medical aid over the past week included:

  • Ukraine

  • Uganda

  • Rwanda

  • Lebanon

  • Haiti

  • India

  • Guyana

  • Dominican Republic

UNITED STATES

Direct Relief delivered 458 shipments containing 1.9 million doses of medications over the past week to organizations, including the following:

  • Welvista, South Carolina

  • NC MedAssist, North Carolina

  • CommunityHealth, Illinois

  • ODA Primary Care Health Center, New York

  • St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Kansas

  • CCI – Gaithersburg, Maryland

  • Greenville Free Medical Clinic, South Carolina

  • Bethesda Health Clinic, Texas

  • South Broward Community Health Services, Florida

  • Matthew 25, Inc., Indiana

YEAR TO DATE (GLOBAL)

Since January 1, 2022, Direct Relief has delivered 10,600 shipments to 1,742 healthcare organizations in 52 U.S. states and territories and 79 countries.

These shipments contained 327 million defined daily doses of medication valued at $1.1 billion (wholesale) and weighing 9.1 million lbs.

IN THE NEWS

  • Emergency response service comes to Mineral County – Clark Fork Valley Press & Mineral Independent:RapidSoS is the world’s first emergency response data platform and they teamed up with The American Heart Association, The American Red Cross, and Direct Relief to launch the program. The initiative is to get first responders critical health information in the event of an urgent situation.”

  • GIS Provides Common Ground for Data – Healthcare IT Today: “Using Esri’s ArcGIS Knowledge product, Direct Relief transformed supply-chain spreadsheets that tracked the medications and medical supplies they delivered to local health providers in disaster zones into a “relationship map”. This visual allowed them to better understand how their aid was being used in the local community and identify potential gaps/overlap in aid.”