Перейти к основному содержанию

From local to global scales - Quantifying climate risks and adaptation opportunities for networked infrastructure systems

Страны
Мир
Источники
UNDRR
Дата публикации
Происхождение
Просмотреть оригинал

Authors

Raghav Pant, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK (Corresponding Author)

Lena I. Fuldauer, School of Geography and Environment, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Xi Hu, Harvard Law School, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, US

Elco E. Koks, Institute for Environmental Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Homero Paltan, School of Geography and Environment, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Tom Russell, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Jasper Verschuur, School of Geography and Environment, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Conrad Zorn, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland, NZ

Jim W. Hall, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Abstract

Investments into infrastructures of energy, transport, water, telecoms, and waste are key to meeting several sustainable development goals and targets set by the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. However, as these investments are being made, ever increasing climate risks threaten existing and new infrastructures, and have the potential to set back development goals by years. Infrastructure planners, investors and policy makers often struggle with the challenges of estimating climate risks at infrastructure asset locations and quantifying the costs of adaptation options to reduce the climate risks. Impacts of climate induced infrastructure failures are magnified due to network cascade effects that propagate across multiple systems, which means that failure footprints extend far beyond asset locations directly vulnerable to climate hazards. Hence, there is a need for understanding and quantifying systemic network risks to strengthen climate adaptation decision-making. There are rapid technological developments that are enabling measurement and assessment of systemic risks and adaptation options for infrastructure networks exposed to extreme climatic hazards, from local to global scales, which this paper reviews. The paper discusses the relevance of the methods and case studies in informing global, national and local policymakers and decision-makers who are involved in understanding climate risks and adaptation needs for infrastructures.