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Sweden and Poland mobilised humanitarian support for Ukraine

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Ukraine
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Govt. Sweden
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On 5 may more than SEK 60 billion in support was announced at a donor conference for Ukraine in Warsaw co-organised by Sweden and Poland together with the EU.

To meet the increasing humanitarian needs and support Ukrainian society, Sweden is allocating an additional SEK 230 million. Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson and Prime Minister of Poland Mateusz Morawiecki co-hosted the donor conference.

“In total, we raised SEK 60 billion, which shows that the rest of the world’s great support for Ukraine remains strong and sustainable,” said Ms Andersson.

In connection with the conference, Minister for International Development Cooperation Matilda Ernkrans led a roundtable discussion on the economic impact of the war.

Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, humanitarian needs in the country are immense and expected to increase further. Approximately 16 million people are in need of help. Roughly eight million people are internally displaced within Ukraine, while over five million people are estimated to have fled the country. The UN’s humanitarian appeal to provide people in Ukraine with life-saving support and protection will amount to USD 2.5 billion by the end of August. To meet the increasing humanitarian needs and to support the Ukrainian people, Sweden has announced an additional SEK 230 million for humanitarian efforts in Ukraine.

“The war is ongoing and humanitarian needs are increasing. Sweden will therefore contribute an additional SEK 230 million. The Ukrainian people need our support and since the war started, we have contributed SEK 775 million to humanitarian efforts in Ukraine and its neighbourhood,” said Ms Andersson.

In connection with the donor conference, Sweden and Poland also arranged a roundtable discussion on the economic impact of the war. Sweden was represented by Minister for International Development Cooperation Matilda Ernkrans.

“While we focus on the acute humanitarian efforts in Ukraine, we also need to manage the long-term economic impact of the war. The rest of the world must support early recovery and, in the long-term, reconstruction,” said Ms Ernkrans.