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UNICEF Syria Crisis Situation Report - March 2019 Humanitarian Results

Countries
Syria
+ 6 more
Sources
UNICEF
Publication date

Highlights

• In the northeast of Syria, UNICEF is closely involved in the provision of services in Al Hol camp (hosting over 73,000 people as of end March, mostly women and children), where the sharp population increase has overstretched the services and humanitarian response capacity. Thousands of children arrived in poor health conditions after suffering prolonged exposure to hostilities and lack of access to basic services and supplies. Hence, UNICEF has been supporting the 24/7 health and nutrition clinic available for screening and consultation, referral to hospitals, child protection referrals to interim care and services to unaccompanied and separated children (UASC), as well as WASH support.

• From 7 to 9 March, UNICEF participated in an inter-agency convoy that delivered humanitarian assistance to meet the urgent needs of 50,000 people in Menbij and surrounding areas in north-east Aleppo Governorate. This was the first time that assistance was delivered to Menbij from Aleppo.

• In Lebanon, more than 176,000 affected men/women/girls/boys have been assisted with temporary access to adequate quantity of safe water, while more than 165,000 affected people have been provided with access to improved safe sanitation in temporary settlements.

• In Jordan, since the beginning of the reporting year, more than 134,000 children (from 5 to 17 years) have been enrolled in formal general education, while 34,000 have been enrolled in informal non-accredited education (Learning Support Services).

• In March, 404,610 children received a payment from the Conditional Cash Transfer for Education Programme for Syrians and other refugees. The total number of refugee children in Turkey who have benefitted from the CCTE since its launch is 494,620, including 1,324 out-of-school children enrolled in the Accelerated Learning Programme.

SITUATION IN NUMBERS

In Syria

5 million # of children affected

11.7 million # of people affected (HNO summary, 2019)

Outside Syria

Over 2.5 million (2,545,795) # of registered Syria refugee children

Almost 5.7 million (5,657,323) # of registered Syrian refugees (UNHCR, 16 April 2019)

UNICEF Appeal 2018

US$ 1.2 Billion

Funding Status US$ 394.7 Million

Syria

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs: In the North-East part of the country (NES), the sharp population increase in Al Hol Camp has overstretched the services and humanitarian response capacity across the board as it is hosting over 73,000 people as of end March, mostly women and children,1 for a camp initially planned to host no more than 20,000 people. The population in the camp has extremely complex needs - thousands of children arrived in poor health conditions 2 after suffering prolonged exposure to hostilities and lack of access to basic services and supplies. UNICEF is closely involved in the provision of services in the camp, supporting the 24/7 health and nutrition clinic available for screening and consultation, referral to hospitals, child protection referral to interim care and services to unaccompanied and separated children (UASC).

Water provision and latrines are also available for new arrivals. UNICEF’s health and nutrition services are provided near the entrance and are accessible to foreign women and children who can exit the annex. Prior to the population surge, foreign families would be chaperoned to access services in the main camp. Child protection services are also closely monitored and supervised by camp authorities.

In the North-West of the country, shelling continued to affect southern Idleb, and northern Hama, resulting in the displacement of 106,066 individuals to neighbouring communities in Aleppo, Hama and Idleb3 . On 30 March, torrential rains and localized flooding negatively impacted the lives of more than 11,000 families in Idleb and Aleppo and led to an increase in needs including shelter, NFIs, insulation, gravelling, heating, plastic sheets, tents, food and bread. UNICEF continues to work in close coordination with the Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) Cluster and other partners to provide immediate support through stocks from emergency prepositioned supplies, non-food items, WASH hygiene kits, water trucking and waste management services, nutrition supplies, psychosocial support and mine risk education. Rapid response teams and other emergency mechanisms were activated and deployed. UNICEF response continues to be guided by its updated response plan and ongoing programming.

Between 24 and 27 March, 361 people reached Homs city from Rukban, with more arrivals anticipated as the Syrian Arab Red crescent (SARC) indicated that 1,700 people are moving from Rukban. UNICEF has been providing supplies (WASH, child protection, winter clothes) and immunization in close coordination with WHO, the Ministry of Health and sector partners. Additionally, UNICEF Homs hub developed a preparedness plan to respond to the needs of those arriving in Homs and Hama Governorates with a planning figure for 6,200 families (31,000 individuals).