Skip to main content

Ethiopia Humanitarian Needs Overview 2019

Countries
Ethiopia
Sources
OCHA
Publication date
Origin
View original

HUMANITARIAN NEEDS & KEY FIGURES

In 2018, Ethiopia faced a significant spike in conflict-induced displacement. Even though drought-related relief food needs have decreased due to the overall good seasonal rains received during the year, the relief food requirement is still significantly high due to new needs resulting from increasing conflict-induced displacement and IDP returnees. Many communities affected by drought in recent years have also yet to recover and, having exhausted their coping capacity, they still remain highly vulnerable to shocks. In total, 8.86 million people require humanitarian and protection assistance in 2019.

Food insecurity & malnutrition

Food insecurity and acute malnutrition levels remain unacceptably high. Communities who suffered consecutive years of severe drought, lost productive assets, or took on significant debts to shoulder the brunt of the crisis, will continue to need sustained humanitarian assistance throughout 2019.

Conflict and displacement have also disrupted vulnerable households’ access to food and livelihood activities, worsening food security and nutrition conditions in the country.
There are 8.13 million people in need of food assistance. Most of these people are in Oromia (52 per cent), Somali (25 per cent) and SNNP (9 per cent) regions. Most severe areas with regards to food insecurity are in Oromia and Afar regions.

Moreover, there are 5.91 million people in need of nutrition assistance. Most of these people are in Oromia (37 per cent), Somali (28 per cent) and SNNP (15 per cent) regions. Most severe areas for nutrition are in Somali region.

Internal displacement

Ethiopia saw a significant increase in internal displacement in 2018 as a result of inter-communal conflict in several pockets of the country, with a near doubling of the IDP and IDP returnee population.

Displacement has a significant effect on people’s lives and livelihoods. IDPs and IDP returnees are, amongst others, exposed to protection risks, are disrupted in their education and vocational training, and lack sustainable livelihood means.

There are 3.19 million IDPs and IDP returnees in need of assistance, out of which 30 per cent are in acute need. Most of the IDPs and IDP returnees are in Oromia (47 per cent), Somali (32 per cent) and SNNP (13 per cent) regions.

Most severe areas are in Oromia and Somali regions.

Morbidity from infectious diseases

Lack of access to safe water and sanitation coupled with poor hygiene practices continue to pose disease outbreak risks in parts of the country. The impact of poor sanitation practices on the health of IDPs and IDP returnees is particularly concerning, especially in areas where the infrastructure is weak and where depleted water tables limit access to safe water.

When communicable diseases are combined with other ongoing problems, such as malnutrition, food insecurity, conflict or displacement, the effect on the population is immense.

There are 3.51 million people in need of assistance in areas affected by disease outbreaks, who are more at risk than others due to the vicinity of these outbreaks. Out of these people in need, 42 per cent are in acute need. Most of the people in need are in Oromia (36 per cent),
Somali (26 per cent) and SNNP (20 per cent) regions. Most severe areas are in Amhara, Oromia and SNNP regions.

Loss of ability to ensure basic self-sustenance

Climatic shocks and conflict have affected or exacerbated people’s ability to ensure basic self-sustenance.

Sporadic unrest often has devastating impact on basic service delivery, including the disruption of health and nutrition services, education, and food security. The more vulnerable rural population, unemployed, and people facing challenges with legal documents are particularly affected when facing shocks.

As is the case in most emergency contexts, women, adolescents and children are disproportionately affected. This concerns accessing legal, physical and material safety in displacement settings, notably documentation, and accessing basic services. The situation is further exacerbated in conditions with acute food insecurity and water-related diseases.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs: To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.