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Global mapping and analysis of anti-vehicle mines incidents in 2017

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Civilians were majority of casualties from anti-vehicle mines in 2017

The Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) have released a new global report of anti-vehicle mine incidents in 2017. The report records a 15 per cent increase in casualties from anti-vehicle mines in 2017, compared to 2016.

There were 169 incidents related, or suspected to be related, to anti-vehicle mines (AVMs) in 24 states and territories, according to the report. These incidents caused 487 casualties in 2017 (166 dead and 321 injured). More than half of these casualties were civilians.

Report reveals strong impact of anti-vehicle mines

The report finds that more than half of the casualties from AVMs were civilians. In some states, AVMs present today a greater threat to civilian populations than anti-personnel mines, yet their use is restricted little in international law. The five states with highest numbers of AVM casualties in 2017 were Pakistan, Ukraine, Mali, Chad and Yemen.

About the report

The report analyses disaggregated AVM incident data collected in 2017, based on joint research from the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). It compares findings with the 2015 and 2016 global AVM incident reports that follow up on a comprehensive study on the “Humanitarian and Developmental Impact of Anti-Vehicle Mines” carried out in 2014. This latest report is a further step in consolidating the evidence on the extent, geography and patterns of the humanitarian impact of AVMs.